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English Language GCSE

Subject Overview

The specification will enable students of all abilities to develop the skills they need to read, understand and analyse a wide range of different texts covering the 19th, 20th and 21st century time periods as well as to write clearly, coherently and accurately using a range of vocabulary and sentence structures.

Dynamic and engaging content

The specification offers the attraction of two equally-balanced papers, relating reading sources to the topic and theme of writing tasks. The reading sources act as stimulus for writing tasks, providing students with a clear route through each paper.

Each paper has a distinct identity to better support high quality provision and engaging teaching and learning. Paper 1, Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing, looks at how writers use narrative and descriptive techniques to engage the interest of readers. Paper 2, Writers' Viewpoints and Perspectives, looks at how different writers present a similar topic over time.

Our approach to spoken language (previously speaking and listening) will emphasise the importance of the wider benefits that speaking and listening skills have for students.

Skills-based approach

The specification offers a skills-based approach to the study of English Language in an untiered context. Questions are designed to take students on an assessment journey through lower tariff tasks to more extended responses.

 

Topic Overview

Autumn Term

Spring term

Summer term

Brief Introduction to the course

The exam papers explained

 Reading: Skimming for the main idea

Writing: Writing for purpose: creative 1

Reading: Annotating the sources

W Reading: Putting it into practice (assessment- annotation)

Writing: Writing for purpose: creative 2

Writing: Writing for purpose: viewpoint 1

Reading: Putting it into practice (assessment- annotation)

Writing: Writing for purpose: viewpoint 2

Reading: The writer’s viewpoint

Writing: Writing for an audience

Reading: Fact opinion and expert evidence.

Writing: Putting it into practice (assessment- descriptive or narrative writing.)

Reading: Explicit information and ideas.

Writing: Putting it into practice (assessment- writing to present a viewpoint.)

Reading: Implicit information and ideas

Writing: Form- articles

Reading: Inference

Writing:  Form- letters and reports

Reading: Point-evidence –explain

Writing: Speeches

Reading: Putting it into practice  assessment- How the writer uses language to achieve particular effects in fiction texts)

Writing: Putting it into practice  (assessment- writing to present a viewpoint)

Reading: Putting it into practice  (assessment- how the writer uses language for effect in non-fiction texts)

Writing: Ideas and planning: creative

Reading: Word clauses

Writing: Structure: creative

Reading: Connotations

Writing: Beginnings and endings

Reading: Figurative language

Writing: Putting it into practice  (assessment- planning creative writing)

Reading: Creation of character

Writing: Ideas and planning: Viewpoint 1

Reading: Creating atmosphere

Writing: Ideas and planning: Viewpoint 2

Reading: Narrative voice

·Writing: Openings: Viewpoint

Reading: Putting it into practice  (assessment- language in a fiction text.)

Writing: Conclusions: viewpoint

Reading: Putting it into practice  (assessment- language choices in a non-fiction text.)

Writing: Putting it into practice  (assessment- presenting a viewpoint)

Reading: Rhetorical devices 1

Writing: Paragraphing

Reading: Rhetorical devices 2

Writing: Linking ideas.

Reading: whole text structure: fiction.

Writing: Putting it into practice  (assessment- paragraphing and adverbials )

Reading: whole text structure: non-fiction.

Writing: Formality and standard English 1

Reading: Identifying sentence types

Writing: Formality and standard English 2

Reading: Commenting on sentences

Writing: Vocabulary for effect: synonyms

Reading: Putting it into practice  (assessment-structure of a fiction text

Writing: Vocabulary for effect: creative)

Reading: Putting it into practice  (assessment-comparing two non-fiction texts

Writing: Vocabulary for effect: viewpoint

Reading: Evaluating a fiction text 1

Writing: Language for different effects 1

Reading: Evaluating a fiction text 2

Writing: Language for different effects 2

Reading: Using evidence to evaluate

Reading: Putting it into practice  (assessment- Evaluating a fiction text critically)

Writing: : Putting it into practice  (assessment- using language effectively in creative writing)

Reading: Writing about two texts

Writing: Putting it into practice  (assessment- using language effectively when writing to present a viewpoint)

Reading: Selecting evidence for synthesis

Writing: Sentence variety 2

Reading: Looking closely at language

Writing: Sentences for different effects

Reading: Planning to compare language

Writing: Putting it into practice  (assessment- varying sentences for effect)

Reading: Comparing language

Writing: Ending a sentence

Reading: Comparing structure

Writing: Commas

Reading: Comparing ideas

Writing: Apostrophes and speech punctuation

Reading: Comparing perspective

Writing: Colons, semi-colons, dashes, brackets and ellipses

Reading: Answering a comparison question

Writing: Putting it into practice  (assessment- using punctuation correctly)

Reading: Putting it into practice  (assessment- comparing the writer’s ideas and perspectives)

Writing: Common spelling errors 1

Writing: Common spelling errors 2

Writing: Common spelling errors 3

Reading: Check that all activities have been completed.

Writing: Proofreading

Sp & L: Introduction to the speaking and listening task including:

Content

Assessment

General criteria

Reading:

Research  current affairs issues and identify one which means something to you

Writing:

Make a list of topics of interest

Sp & L Share topics with the group

Reading: Research two of the list of topics

Writing: Make mind maps/ bullet points/lists, of the two chosen topics

Sp & L: Discuss progress with teachers/support assistants.

Reading: Choose one of the topics and research in more depth

Writing: Start to create a first draft of the presentation

Sp & L: share progress with the group

Reading: Read over the presentation and evaluate and edit

Writing: Amend if necessary

Sp & L: Read the introduction to a member of staff and if confident the group.

Reading: Continue to refine the content after receiving feedback from staff and students.

Writing: Make alterations

Sp & L: Record your presentation

Reading: Read your presentation as you listen to it being played back.

Writing: Make notes on written copy if necessary.

Sp & L: re-record presentation.

If the student is ready , they can present to the group or staff member it more appropriate.

Reading: Check through all previous tasks and make sure they are complete and that you have understood the content.

Writing: Check through all previous tasks and make sure they are complete and that you have understood the content.

Sp & L: Student presentations

 

Revision/ past exam papers

 

 

Examination Board

AQA English Language 8700

Learning beyond the classroom

Northgate runs yearly theatre trips and works with Articulate in identifying and running a range of creative writing workshops in the school holidays. Students are encouraged to explore the creativity and impact of language and in their own time write poetry, stories and keep a journal. They are also encourage to read a range of sources for pleasure, including blogs, creative writing websites, online books and Kindle. Of course they can also visit their local library where many workshops are run for free or for a small charge. Many private writing workshops are run all over London in term and holiday times. I fee may be charged in these instances.

Progression Pathways and Careers

What careers could this subject lead to?

By undertaking this course students will effectively be able to progress to a variety of A level and BTEC courses or apply for apprenticeships in  associated fields. An A*- C grade is necessary when applying for a career in all professions.

Useful Links

For further details Contact

Caroline Phillips – cphillips6.302@lgfl.org